“To thine own self be true” is the motto that June Carty lived by. She never apologized for being exactly who she was. June’s daughter, Mitzi, describes her mother as a brilliant, beautiful and complicated woman who served as a powerful role model to her children, grandchildren and everyone who knew her.

June loved her children, but she didn’t show them affection in a conventional way. Not one to dote on them, cook for them, or even fold their clothes, June focused her energy on teaching them to be strong and independent. She modeled this in her distinguished career and activism on Capitol Hill. As the administrative assistant for the Chairman of the Ways and Means committee, no one got by June easily. When she walked into a room, people stood out of respect for her. When she was seated, June could often be found with a cigar in one hand and a Jack Daniels in the other.

The final chapter of June’s life closed with the same strength and determination. June believed that “death is just birth, but on the other side”. She wanted to die on her own terms and was clear about her wishes with her family and professional caregivers. Mitzi shares that her mother’s Capital Caring team supported Mitzi when she advocated for June’s choices with tremendous compassion and understanding. They were a “best friend” to Mitzi during a very difficult time. Mitzi says that the Capital Caring team was her strength when she thought she ran out of strength on her own. “It felt like my mom and I were the most important people in the world to our Capital Caring team during those last days of Mom’s life.”

“The greatest gift for a family is to be able to say, ‘I have no regrets’, and Capital Caring made that possible for my family,” says Mitzi. There was no one in the world quite like June Carty, and Mitzi is grateful that this unique mother was cared for so beautifully during her final days. June leaves a legacy of a remarkable woman who pioneered the way for future generations of women to follow.