By Sara Moore Kerai, MA, LPC, Grief Counselor, Capital Caring, Washington, D.C.

What comes to mind when you contemplate the transition from winter to spring?

Spring is often associated with rebirth, relief, new life, and a sense of hopefulness. But for those who are grieving, the spring can be a bittersweet and painful season, triggering painful reminders of “this time last year,” rather than happy anticipation.

Mother’s Day is a hallmark of spring, but for my grief counseling clients who are grieving the death of a mother, or for mothers grieving the death of a child, it is one of the most difficult holidays of the entire year.  Also, the perceived pressure to tackle spring cleaning, which might include sorting through and donating a loved one’s clothing and possessions, can add to the stress of the change of seasons.

However, springtime also provides many opportunities for self-care, which is an important component in healing from a loss.

Below are helpful tips for healing, self-care activities and information about Capital Caring’s grief support groups:

  • Participating in activities such as walking, bicycle riding, meditative hikes, putting your toes in the green grass, planting, gardening, or going to a yoga or dance class, improves the mind-body connection.
  • Research shows that focusing on activities involving our five senses and our bodies, such as paying attention to our walking steps, noticing the sun on our skin, or feeling the grass beneath our feet, helps our brains recover from stressful events.

Capital Caring grief counselors are offering several programs to support you in your grief journey this spring, including spring strolls and mindfulness walks in Arlington and Alexandria; Mother Loss Workshops in Washington. D.C.  and Largo, Maryland; and many other support groups and programs for those who are grieving the death of a loved one.

Please join us for a moment of healing and self-care.  Learn more about our grief support groups and other programs here.